Hunting American Whiskey Heritage at the Wild Turkey Distillery

CocktailWonk Rating: 7/10 ($10)

Following an epic expedition through eight Kentucky and Tennessee whiskey distilleries in October 2014, Mrs. Wonk and I returned a year later, visiting six more major players and completing our regional Tour de Bourbon. While every distillery is unique and interesting in its own way, there are certain common elements such as fermentation tanks and rick houses that you’ll see on just about any tour. In a prior post, I described these common elements in detail, allowing me to focus this post on my observations about the Wild Turkey distillery. If you’re not familiar with the whiskey-making process, I’d suggest starting with that post.

“Wild Turkey? Are we really going there?” Such was the response from Mrs. Wonk when I outlined this year’s march through Kentucky Bourbon distilleries. If you’re old enough, you may have an impression of Wild Turkey as being inexpensive, less-than-stellar bourbon consumed in mass quantity by hard living folks like Hunter S. Thompson. That said, when those impressions were forming, bourbon and rye were less exalted than they are now, in the midst of the current whiskey craze, where folks pay exorbitant premiums for bottles labeled as the current “hot ticket.”  The upside to the current enthusiasm is that Wild Turkey’s reputation, helped in part by the Russell’s Reserve lineup, has shot up again. Thus I was able to construct a convincing argument to Mrs. Wonk that a visit was essential.  (Not that there was much discussion, she notes.

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Roaming through the Buffalo Trace Distillery

CocktailWonk Rating: 8/10 (Hard Hat Tour – free)

Following an epic expedition through eight Kentucky and Tennessee whiskey distilleries in October 2014, Mrs. Wonk and I returned a year later, visiting six more major players and completing our regional Tour de Bourbon. While every distillery is unique and interesting in its own way, there are certain common elements such as fermentation tanks and rick houses that you’ll see on just about any tour. In a prior post, I described these common elements in detail, allowing me to focus this post on my observations about the Buffalo Trace Distillery. If you’re not familiar with the whiskey-making process, I’d suggest starting with that post.

Located on the banks of the Kentucky River on the outskirts of Frankfort, the Buffalo Trace distillery is the birthplace of numerous beloved bourbon and rye brands, including of course Buffalo Trace. But check out some of the other brands beloved brands distilled there:

  • Blanton’s
  • Colonel E.H. Taylor
  • Elmer T. Lee
  • George T. Stagg
  • (Pappy) Van Winkle
  • W.L. Weller
  • Sazerac

Surprisingly, Sazerac also produces vodka, but let’s just pretend I didn’t mention that.

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Touring the Jim Beam American Stillhouse

useCocktailWonk Rating: 8/10 ($10 tour)

Following an epic expedition through eight Kentucky and Tennessee whiskey distilleries in October 2014, Mrs. Wonk and I returned a year later, visiting six more major players and completing our regional Tour de Bourbon. While every distillery is unique and interesting in its own way, there are certain common elements such as fermentation tanks and rick houses that you’ll see on just about any tour. In a prior post, I described these common elements of these tours in detail, allowing me to focus this post on my observations about the Jim Beam American Stillhouse. If you’re not familiar with the whiskey-making process, I’d suggest starting with that post.

Jim Beam is the flagship brand of Beam Suntory, a vast conglomerate of spirts makers with a focus on whisk(e)y. In addition to Jim Beam, other Beam Suntory labels include Maker’s Mark, Laphroaig, Bowmore, Auchentoshan, Canadian Club, Alberta Premium, Connemara, Hibiki, Hukushu, and Yamazaki. In the non-whiskey category it owns producers like Sauza Tequila, Courvoisier cognac, Cruzan rum, and Gilbey’s gin. To say Beam Suntory is huge is an understatement; deep pockets mean lot of money available to promote its brands. So what’s the Jim Beam American Stillhouse experience, given all this corporate backing?

Like many Kentucky distilleries, the American Stillhouse pops up seemingly out of nowhere alongside a rural two-lane highway about a half hour drive south of Louisville, in Clermont, KY. Driving up the half mile winding lane to the visitor’s center, you pass a small cemetery, dating back to the early 1800s. Although it’s not affiliated with the Jim Beam distillery, it provides a context to the bourbon making you’ll soon see.

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Touring Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery in Nashville

CocktailWonk Rating: 6.5/10 ($10 tour)

Following an epic expedition through eight Kentucky and Tennessee whiskey distilleries in October 2014, Mrs. Wonk and I returned a year later, visiting six more major players and completing our regional Tour de Bourbon. While every distillery is unique and interesting in its own way, there are certain common elements such as fermentation tanks and rick houses that you’ll see on just about any tour. In a prior post, I described these common elements of these tours in detail, allowing me to focus this post on my observations about the Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery. If you’re not familiar with the whiskey-making process, I’d suggest starting with that post.

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Situated in a renovated warehouse building in west Nashville, Nelson’s Greenbrier is just a few blocks down the street from Corsair Artisan Distillery, forming the beginnings of a distillery row. Nelson’s is quite new, only open for a year at the time of this writing. Despite that, their distillery DSP code is DSP-TN-5, indicating it’s one of Tennessee’s first registered distilleries. What gives? A pretty great family story, actually. Back in the late 1800s, a gentleman named Charles Nelson founded the original Green Brier distillery, which soon became the state’s largest distiller, handily out-producing those little guys, Jack Daniels.

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