A Victory Lap Around Indy’s Craft Cocktail Scene at Mixture 2016

In any city worth its cocktails, there’s at least one or more person who cuts a wide swath of influence across the local bar scene and rises to national prominence – a person whose name becomes linked with the city and its drinking culture. Seattle has many, including Andrew Friedman, Jamie Boudreau, and Anu Apte. In Portland, Jeffrey Morgenthaler fills that role, while Huston has Bobby Heugel. In Indianapolis, Crossroads of America, Ed Rudisell is on track to join that club.

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Navigating Smuggler’s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki, by Martin and Rebecca Cate

A recent trend in the cocktail world is for high-end, world class “destination” bars and celebrity bartenders to further extend their brand and cement their reputation via authoring a book. Some hotly anticipated tomes of note recently include The PDT Cocktail Book (PDT, NYC), Speakeasy (Employees Only, NYC), Death & Co. (Death & Co., NYC), and The Bar Book (Jeffrey Morgenthaler, Portland, OR). All have been eagerly anticipated and well received. In that light, the only surprise is that Martin and Rebecca Cate’s new book, Smuggler’s Cove – Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki, took so long to appear on the cocktail book scene. In fairness, they’ve been a little busy with other things, like oh…opening Whitechapel, a shrine to gin akin to what San Francisco’s Smuggler’s Cove is to rum.

Even among the cocktail enthusiast population, the Tiki crowd is particularly passionate and eager for fresh material. I’ve witnessed firsthand the insane demand and interest for the Smuggler’s Cove book, scheduled to be generally available in early June 2016. As the fortunate recipient of one of the first books off the press, I’ve taken on the task of reading the entire opus–which clocks in at a solid 350 pages from cover to cover. As a teaser before jumping into my thoughts about the volume overall, here are ten of my favorite factoids you’ll encounter:

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At the Bar with Seattle’s Tiki Warrior Justin Wojslaw

The Tiki revival movement is clearly having its moment these days, having been heralded in dozens of articles to that effect. Even an old standby like The Washington Post has gotten into the act, running stories about Jeff “Beachbum” Berry and how to make your own orgeat. This is indisputably a good thing for people like yours truly who enjoy a balanced, expertly crafted tropical libation rather than a quart of fruit punch with cheap white rum thrown in. The elaborately constructed rum rhapsodies of the 1940 and 1950s took a serious dive downward for the following fifty years, picking up bad habits like flavored vodka and powdered drink mixes. By the start of the 21st century, Tiki was just about left for dead, consumed ironically if at all. Fortunately, the rise of the craft cocktail movement swept Tiki into its whirlwind of vintage recipes and ingredients. A decade or so later, dedicated Tiki-centric bars are popping up all over the world and modern Tiki recipes are just as easy to find as the classic Donn Beach, Trader Vic, and Steve Crane recipes from the 1930s through1950s.

Inevitably, tons of “Best Tiki Bars” lists have popped up online. Of the current “modern era” Tiki bars, these lists inevitably cite Smuggler’s Cove, Hale Pele, Latitude 29, Three Dots and a Dash, and Lost Lake, among others—all worthy of your drinking time. At the same time, a set of celebrity Tiki bartenders has become the face of the Tiki revival – people like Jeff Berry, Martin Cate, Blair Reynolds, and Paul McGee. You’ll find quotes from these fine folks all over the coverage of Tiki these days. They’ve all contributed significantly to Tiki’s new modern era, embracing the classics but not being bound by them either. A lot of attention is lavished on these revivalists, and deservedly so.

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Cocktail Obsession – Banana Stand, From Seattle’s Rob Roy

As someone who spends, shall we say, significant time in bars, fatigue from parsing ingredient lists on cocktail menus is an occupational hazard. So many Old Fashioned variations, so many twists on a daiquiri. No slight to the actual drinks, but a recipe that’s completely from out of left field is a rarity – that’s something I gotta have! The Banana Stand at Seattle’s Rob Roy absolutely falls into that category.

The Banana Stand is the brainchild of Zac Overman, a Tiki savant and recent transplant to Seattle — score one for us! Monday nights at Rob Roy are known as Tangaroa Roy–a celebration of Tiki, with anything but traditional Tiki classics. The Banana Stand made its first appearance at a Tangaroa Roy that happened to coincide with Seattle’s Women Who Love Whiskey anniversary party. Zac created a custom menu heavy on the whiskey, and The Banana Stand practically leapt off the page at me. Laphroaig? Crème de Banane? An automatic yes!

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Cocktail Obsession: Pizzicato Passage

Seattle winters are more cool gray drizzle than snow, and our rainy Decembers are mostly indistinguishable from our Novembers and Januarys. But for people of the spirited persuasion, December in Seattle means one thing: Rob Roy’s Advent Calendar cocktail menu. Twenty five different drinks, holiday themed (or at least wintery), and many only available on their designated days as they require special ingredients and preparation. Leaving the best for last, December 24th is commemorated with the Chartreuse Blazer –a sibling of the infamous Blue Blazer, involving flaming streams of chartreuse poured long distances between metal mugs.

This year though, an earlier recipe in the calendar caught my attention. I’m always on the lookout for oddball combinations of ingredients, and my eyes popped when I saw sherry, Meletti, gin, and Ancho Reyes all in the same drink! Dubbed the Pizzicato Passage, the recipe is the brainchild of Rob Roy owner and all around mixology badass Anu Elford. In case you’re wondering, pizzicato is the Italian term for “plucked string,” a stringed instrument playing technique.

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California Rum Fest 2015 and Rational Spirits Santeria Pre-Launch

It’s 10 PM on Saturday night and I’m standing in the dark by the side of Highway 17 in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California. Bryan Davis, master distiller of Lost Spirits holds his iPhone aloft, flashlight lit, to help our friend Anders snap a rum bottle photo. A few feet away, a twelve-person party bus sits motionless with its doors open, exposing a veritable dance club’s worth of lighting. An epic Tiki party is awaiting us less than five miles away, if only we could get there. How is this my life? Let’s take it from the beginning – a photo tour of my crazy, rum-packed weekend.

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A Wonky New Orleans Cocktail Bar Roundup

If there’s one thing New Orleans is not short on, it’s bars. In the touristy part of town (the French Quarter) you can’t go more than a block without seeing people spilling out of a bar, clutching frozen Daiquiris in a to-go cup – practically the official mascot of New Orleans. All of Bourbon Street seems to be one continuous bar, the highlight being the ill-advised “Hand Grenade”: gin, rum, vodka, grain alcohol, Midori, with a float of regret. Sure, you can head over to Pat O’Brien’s for an authentic “Hurricane” – don’t forget to pick up some powdered Hurricane Mix as you leave.

Yes, there’s much for a craft cocktail connoisseur to shake their head at in New Orleans. There are plenty of world-class bars in NOLA though– a cocktail wonk just needs to be more diligent in seeking out bars worthy of time and attention. What follows is in no way a complete list of every worthy bar in NOLA – that would take months. But as an obsessive bar hound who’s always looking for the next great “score,” what follows are a few you should put on your A-list.

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Rumtastic Happenings at Tales of the Cocktail 2015

It’s 8:45 AM on the second full day of Tales of the Cocktail 2015, and I’m in bed, dreading the imminent alarm clock. Only a few hours earlier I’d been drinking 140 proof Jamaican Rum and cask-strength rye at an impromptu hotel room get-together, followed by a nightcap at the Monteleone’s Carousel bar, before finally falling into bed at 2:30 AM. What I really need is more sleep, but I’m scheduled to drink more rum in an hour. Ordinarily I’d miss the rum and opt for more shut-eye but this is no ordinary tasting. No sir! Plantation Rums had reached deep into their rum reserves, picked of their best casks from all over the Caribbean, and bottled just enough for two dozen people to enjoy at Tales. At 10 AM. The things I do for rum….

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The Cocktail Wonk Guide to Great Cocktail Bar Photos with Your Camera Phone

Canon, Seattle
Being any sort of respectable spirits blogger these days requires you to have a social media presence beyond just your blog, be it Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc… I devote most of my efforts into documenting my wonk lifestyle on Instagram (@cocktailwonk), which means plenty of drink photos from dimly lit cocktail bars. Along the way I’ve picked up a respectable level of Instagram followers and have a pretty good sense how to create photos that resonate with people.

What follows are my tips for creating great looking bar-based cocktail photos, often in low light, and with just a smartphone. I use an iPhone 6, but have every reason to believe the camera-based tips would work similarly on Android phones. In special circumstances, such as a special event or seeking out a bar while we’re traveling, I’ll use a dedicated camera, but these tips are for the enthusiast drinker who has a smartphone handy and wants a good shot.

Focus
So many people have no idea that you can tell your phone’s camera where to focus. An iPhone in a dark bar does a lousy job of figuring out where the center of attention should be. So tell it: A quick tap on the screen points to where you want the image to be most sharp; the yellow square that appears confirms the focus location.

Exposure

Even fewer people know the camera also adjusts its exposure for the focus location. Thus, with a dark drink in a dark bar, tapping on the screen image of the drink (rather than something in the background) prior to taking the picture sets the exposure for the drink and not the much brighter lights behind the bar. Pro tip: If you’ve got a new enough iPhone you can adjust the exposure before taking the photo by sliding the “sun” up or down.

Subject

Perhaps the drink is visually amazing – it’s on fire, or has a fantastic garnish, or is in a great glass– or maybe all three! In which case, get up close. Fill the frame with what’s cool. On the other hand, if the drink is more pedestrian, zoom out a bit and capture why you think this drink is worth commemorating. In a really snazzy looking room? Capture a bit of the bar background in your photo. Hot bartender?  Immortalize them alongside their work. Every photo should showcase the reason you took it. If it’s just an up-close image of brown liquid in an ungarnished coupe, no one cares.
In close to capture the garnish details, Tacoma Cabana
Including bar elements as backdrop, Beretta, San Francisco
Any time Murray Stenson makes me a drink, it’s photo-worthy. Elysian Bar, Seattle.
Flash
No. Seriously.  Do. Not. Use. It. Flash photos look washed-out and crappy, and you annoy the folks around you. I mock my friends to their faces when they use flash in a bar. And don’t think you’re being clever by snapping a photo while your friend floodlights the scene with their own phone’s LED light. It still doesn’t look good, and now everyone else is annoyed with both of you.
Don’t do this. Ever.
Lighting
While flash is a no-no, don’t hesitate to acquire and use more subtle light sources. Candles are the most obvious choice, if available. With the right drink and glass, a candle hidden behind the glass can provide a nice glow effect. A candle off to the side, just out of frame, often works wonders. And sometimes an artfully placed candle in the frame makes a great shot. Recently I ordered a drink at Seattle’s Rumba and GM Kate Perry delivered a candle with the drink without my asking. At times I’ve collected several candles together near a reflective surface to create a crude “studio light,” but then again, I can be a bit obsessive.
Candle lit from the side, Hemingway Bar, Prague
Built in LED underlights at Bugsy’s, Prague
Props
If the bar offers fun visual elements that can be worked in to your photo, use them! At Seattle’s Canon, the legendary pork buns arrive with a small metal toy cannon. At Rumba, there are a few 10-inch brass palm trees that always liven up a shot. At Rob Roy (again, in Seattle) the infamous hoof lamp (as in the cattle variety) that often pops up in photos. If there are visually fun ingredients in your cocktail–perhaps a house-made tincture or some exotic bottle of spirits– including it in the photo can add to its relevance. Just try not to annoy the bartenders with oddball requests. If you ask nicely on a slow night, many are happy to help you stage your shot.
Rumba, Seattle.
Why is this drink special? Because it has Stiggins’s Fancy rum in it! Tacoma Cabana.
Bar logos
The bar menu itself is often a good prop–for instance, Callooh Callay’s London Tube map, or the paint fans at Trick Dog in San Francisco. Drop it casually next to the drink; it’s not necessary to get the whole menu in, but ideally the logo or bar name is visible. Even better are the one-off menus that bars create for special events. A bit of that in your photo gives you a more unique photo and, of course, bragging rights.
The artfully placed menu, Tretter’s new York Bar, Prague
Angles
The standard 45-degree overhead shot often isn’t the most interesting perspective. Try shooting from below the glass. This works best with coupes, especially if the liquid within is translucent, and you can often pick up backlighting from sources elsewhere in the room, such as the backbar. If there are multiple drinks, lining them up and then shooting from the side captures a unique perspective.
Shooting from below – Loló, San Francisco

 

A non-traditional angle – Trailer Happiness, London
When to shoot
As soon as possible. A photo of a half empty glass just isn’t visually appealing. Bartenders frequently take care to create a great presentation for your drink before serving it — use that to your advantage. In the past, I’ve annoyed Mrs. Wonk by taking longer than I should to photograph our newly arrived drinks with multiple shots (and even multiple cameras) from different angles, making her wait to imbibe. With practice, I’ve vastly improved how quickly I can get a keeper shot.

Depth of field

If doing a wide-field shot (rather than a close up), use depth of field to your advantage. Slightly blurred backgrounds with shelves of bottles, mixing tins, tinctures and bitters, and even the bartenders themselves give a nice ambience to bar photos. The trick again is focus. Tell the camera to focus on the bottle, and things significantly behind it will be blurred, creatively known as bokeh.
Serious bokeh at Rob Roy, Seattle
Post processing
Professional photographers manipulate their images for best results. So should you. It’s really quite easy and fast once you’re familiar with the in-phone tools.I’m not a big fan of filters; I rarely use them, much preferring the more basic controls readily available in either the basic iPhone photo editor or in Instagram. Sure, you can go all Adobe Photoshop on your images if you have the time and inclination, but I can edit an image to my liking in 15 seconds or less.
Before straightening and enhancing
After straightening and enhancing – Much better!
Every photo I post goes through most, if not all of these steps, in this order:

1) Straighten and crop. I have a particularly bad habit of taking photos that are just slightly not level. I fix this first, and then zoom and crop the image to fill as much of the frame as possible with what’s interesting.

2) Adjust exposure. If the whole image is dark, I adjust the overall brightness to a better level, but not so much that it gets grainy. In the default iOS photo editor, this is done via Light/Exposure slider. If the overall brightness is okay but certain details are lost in the shadows, use the Light/Shadows slider to brighten just those parts. The Instagram equivalents are under the “wrench” tool: Brightness and Shadows.

3) Enhance colors and contrast. Sometimes simply adjusting the contrast to make details stand out is sufficient. When the image feels flat, bumping up the saturation (in moderation) is all that’s needed. In the Instagram app, the “Lux” slider is frequently one-stop-shopping, doing everything I need to make the photo pop.

Adjusting exposure with the iOS photo editor
Most useful Instagram conrols
If you’re looking for good examples of bar photography, here are a few Instagram accounts that I follow who consistently post great bar photos: @wayofthewong, @tikicommando, @carolineoncrack, @denizenrum, @livethelushlife, and @mezcalelsilencio. And although primarily staged shots rather than in the field, @beautifulbooze posts consistently great drink photography no matter what environment she’s in.

 

Bar Notes: Tretter’s (Prague)

Cocktail Wonk Rating: 7.5/10
Tretter’s styles itself as a classic New York bar from the early 1930s and it succeeds at evoking that vibe: Mosaic tile bar counter, vintage cash registers, and an antique mirror running the entire length of the backbar. Bartenders wear white smocks, accenting the fact that Tretter’s also runs a bartending academy of which all bartenders must graduate.

Taking our seats at the long bar, we dove into the cocktail menu: a small bound book, extensive with more than 100 drinks, and featuring classic cocktails as well as Tretter’s originals. My first drink was a Crescit Sour (Genever, Chartreuse, lime, honey water, lemon bitters, egg white), which Mrs. Wonk and I both agreed was delicious. Mrs. Wonk enjoyed her Aperol Cherry Julep (Aperol, lemon, black cherry, elderflower tonic, mint leaves).

Along the bar counter, within easy reach (yes, I did restrain myself) is a large collection of various dry ingredients. Lots of dried fruits and leaves, as well as more unusual ingredients like marzipan and caraway seeds. Scanning through the cocktail menu I could tell these ingredients weren’t just for show. For round two, I had a Provocateur (inexplicably I didn’t record the ingredients, other than the aforementioned marzipan), while Mrs. Wonk had an expertly executed Green Park (gin, lemon, basil leaves, egg white, simple syrup, celery bitters).

Mrs. Wonk, with her great eye for detail, noted a few things in the space needed attention, such as mosaic tiles missing from the bar counter and some threadbare carpet on the stairs leading down to the rest rooms.  Rather than evoke a vintage feel, the space leaned more toward shopworn and in need of some updating, however superficial. Bar staff was mostly warm and welcoming, as were all of those we spoke to in Prague, but not the most effusive of our visit.

Both Tretter’s and nearby Bugsy’s strive to emulate a New York bar experience from the early 20th century, albeit decades apart. Both put out excellently crafted cocktails, but I give the nod to Bugsy’s for their overall execution of the theme as well as focus on the little details.