The Essential Arsenal of Tiki Rums

When I first fell down the Tiki rabbit hole, working my way through Beachbum Berry’s Sippin’ Safari, I realized how little I knew about rums. Demerara, Jamaican, Lemon Hart, Virgin Island, Trinidad, Wray and Nephew… So many names and styles to keep track of and start acquiring! Since then my rum collection’s grown far beyond the space I set aside when designing my home bar.

By this point I’ve made enough Tiki recipes to have a good sense of what I keep coming back to over and over in my Tiki drinks. These are the bottles that I always have a backup bottle or two in reserve. Most of these rums aren’t traditionally considered “sipping” rums, so just because a superb rum like Mount Gay X0 isn’t on this list doesn’t mean I don’t consider enjoy it.

This list isn’t intended to be comprehensive and cover every rum style used in Tiki. The list is also constrained by brands available to me in the United States, which is often much different than what’s available elsewhere, especially with the more boutique brands.

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Lemon Hart 151 to become scarce again?

This was posted on the Lemon Hart 151 Facebook page last night:
“I”m sorry too report that Mosaiq, the Lemon Hart brand owner, has decided not to bottle any more Lemon Hart 151 until at least the middle of 2015. I wish I had the opportunity to buy more and offered to buy 5,000 cases but was turned down. Planning is everything. I’m working on obtaining another overproof rum that will work in many of the cocktails you love.”

A dark, Demerara style rum from Guyana, Lemon Hart 151 is one of canonical Tiki drink ingredients, used in drinks like the Zombie. I’ve not been able to find any details beyond this, but if you’re running low, now might be a good time to stock up.

I do recall that the Peace Arch US/Canada border crossing had Lemon Hart, so if you’re coming back into the US from Canada soon, there may be opportunities there.

I’ll update this as I learn more. [[Well, four years later, this didn’t happen. 🙂 ]]

The Hampden Negroni, featuring Smith & Cross rum

The Hampden Negroni (yeah yeah, I did this one over ice)

Next week (June 2-8, 2014) is National Negroni Week, but being impatient, I’m sharing my favorite Negroni variation now. The Negroni is a very common and simple cocktail pattern, but one that offers a near infinite variety of combinations of ingredients that sing together. To quickly recap:

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Classic and Modern Tiki and Recipes from the Tacoma Cabana

The Seattle area hasn’t had a true authentic full-time Tiki bar for several years, despite being the location of the first franchised Trader Vics in the 1940s. There was a Trader Vic’s in Bellevue a few years back but they shuttered after a few years. Hula Hula positions themselves as Polynesian, but they’re far from well-crafted Tiki. Rumba specializes in all sorts of rum drinks and does Tiki well, but Tiki isn’t their focus. Portland is known for its Tiki Kon gathering and the Hale Pele bar is well respected in the Tiki world. But if you’re looking for full time, petal-to-the-metal Tiki in the Pacific Northwest, the Tacoma Cabana is your destination.

UPDATE: As of 2018, the Tiki heart of the Cabana now lives at Devil’s Reef.

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Checking out Seattle’s new Elysian Bar, and a Mezcal/Cherry Heering cocktail

The back bar at the Elysian Bar

Seattle has a solid base of top shelf cocktail bars that hold their own with bars in New York, London and San Francisco. The recently opened Elysian Bar aims to join that elite club and based on the people involved, stands a good chance at that. When Seattleites hear Elysian, they think of the Elysian Brewing Company in Capitol Hill, or Elysian Fields by the stadiums, both being what you’d expect from a decent microbrewery. The Elysian Bar in Downtown Seattle is more refined, focusing on good food and a much stronger cocktail program, which I’m all about.

There’s strong connection between The Elysian and Zig Zag Café, although the two are very different. Kacy Fitch and Murray Stenson, formerly of Zig Zag were both working when I visited on a quiet Monday night. Murray needs no introduction, and Kacy runs the bar program. Whereas Zig Zag feels like a small, intimate hole in the wall with a veritable liquor library behind the bar, the Elysian feels like an moderately upscale restaurant. The bar is long and the liquor selection is reasonably large but not overwhelming like at Canon or Zig Zag.

Murray in silhouette

Although I usually go off-menu when drinking at nicer bars, I always make a careful reading of the house cocktails to assess what the bar says about itself. The Elysian’s cocktail menu is similar to Zig Zag’s menu – Lots of spirit-forward, three or four ingredient drinks using upmarket sprits and liqueurs. The complete opposite of those type of drinks is the Planter’s punch, which also appeared on the menu. I’m a big punch fan, but it seemed like an odd inclusion. The Elysian at this point isn’t about house-made infusions, tinctures, syrups and such. Other bars in Seattle such as Liberty and Rob Roy tread that ground.

The Elysian Bar cocktail menu

Besides just checking the place out, the other reason I visited was to catch up with Connor O’Brien who’s also bartending there. Connor was previously the bar manager at Rumba and I spent more than a few nights there wonking out with him about rum and cocktail recipes. The Elysian has a much more diverse palate of spirits to draw upon, so after trying a Crux #2 off the menu I asked Connor to make me something “dark and interesting”. He took a while to survey the bottles, and what he eventually set in front of me is a real winner. He was kind enough to jot down the recipe:

Connor O’Brien’s Mezcal creation

“Experiment # 1 million”

  • 1 3/4 oz Vida mezcal
  • 1/2 oz Bigallet China China
  • 1/2 oz Punt e Mes
  • 1/4 oz dry vermouth
  • 1/3 oz Cherry Heering

The smokiness of the mezcal, the smooth sweetness of the Heering, and the bitters blend together quite well. I’ll be making this myself at home. While I don’t have China China amaro on hand (yet), I do have a bottle of Picon Club that I squirreled back from a trip to Spain a few years back.

Following the mezcal drink, Connor made several more damn tasty drinks, including a five rum punch:

Five Rum Punch

My take: The Elysian Bar is off to a solid start and well worth a visit, especially if you go at a less busy time, sit at the bar, and get to know the excellent bartending staff.

Diplomatico Rum Lunch

 

Great food and rum at La Isla

I recently attended a lunch at La Isla restaurant in Seattle hosted by Diplomatico Rum, celebrating the return of Diplomatico’s line of rums to Washington State stores after an absence of several years. Alex Mejido of Domaine Select Wine Estates, a wine and spirit importer led us through tastings of the Anejo, Reserva, and Reserva Exclusiva expressions. Alas, there was no Ambassador to be had that day, but everybody seemed happy with the three we tasted.

Alex started by telling us some backstory on the Diplomatico company. Although I’ve loved the Reserva Exclusiva for years, having been introduced to it by Murray Stenson during his time at Canon, I wasn’t aware that the origin of Diplomatico rum starts with the Seagrams company back in the 1950s. It seems that Seagrams oversaw the creation and owned 51% of what’s now the DUSA distillery in Venezuela to produce a number of spirits, including rum. In the 1990s Seagrams was bought by Diageo and Pernod Ricard, which jointly held the distillery until 2002, when José R. Ballesteros Melendez took control of the distillery. Today, the distillery produces Diplomatico rum, as well as Cacique rum. In addition, it supplies heavy pot still rums for use in the Pampero brand of rum. Alex also mentioned that in addition to molasses, Diplomatico rum also includes what they call “sugar cane honey”. A more accurate term would be concentrated cane juice, i.e. sugar cane juice with all the original sugars intact, but with some of the water removed.

For the Diplomatico brand, the DUSA distillery uses a combination of column and pot still rums. We started with the Anejo which is a blend of pot and column still distillates, aged for four years. Next up was the Reserva with a bit higher percentage of the pot still, and aged for 8 years. Last was the Reserva Exclusiva, which is renowned in rum circles for being very delicious, sippable and sweet, and aged for up to 12 years.

Beyond tasting the rums, I also enjoyed great conversations with people seated next to me. My friend Jason Alexander from Tacoma Cabana was on my left as we continued our ever-present tiki discussion. On my right was Colin Kimball of Small Screen Network, producers of many great cocktail videos by Robert Hess, Jamie Boudreau, and others. Also on my right was Jeff Shilling, Party Chairman of The Cocktail Party, and social media lead at Total Wine.  A great lunch, good rum and good conversation. You can’t beat that!