Rummy Fun at Miami Rum Renaissance 2015

The annual Miami Rum Renaissance show is equal parts rum evangelism to the curious and family reunion for the hard-core rum crowd. Having inexplicably missed Rum Renaissance last year, it was at the top of my 2015 list of non-negotiable trips, along with the upcoming Tales of the Cocktail in July.
 
Show organizer Robert Burr and RumXP judges announcing winners
The core of Rum Renaissance is a three-day exhibition, held at the Miami Airport Convention Center, wherein rum producers host booths for sampling rum and related goodies – rum cake, anyone? Some companies go all out in a large booth with tons of ornamentation, while others are more spartan, choosing to let the rums speak for themselves. A few days prior to the event an assembled panel of rum experts (RumXPs) judge dozens of rums in various classes, electing a “Best in Class” and three gold medals per class. The results are announced the evening of the first day, and medals are handed out for prominent display by the winning vendors over the following two days.
Rums of Puerto Rico booth with RumXP medals
Plantation Rum shows off their RumXP medals
Lost Spirits, which I’ve coveredextensively, has been in the news of late about their plan for a spirits aging “reactor” that claims to provide the equivalent of twenty years of aging in six days. Leading up to Rum Renaissance, master distiller Bryan Davis had announced a new rum called Prometheus, modeled after the 33-year aged Port Mourant from Guyana, to debut at Rum Renaissance. To say the Prometheus was highly anticipated by the rum cognoscenti is an understatement. Although finished bottles of Prometheus were not on hand for sale, Bryan brought a sample bottle that he shared with a few lucky folks, myself included. I look forward to reviewing it once available.
 
Lost Spirits Prometheus sample
 
Richard Seale (Foursquare) and Bryan Davis, Lost Spirits booth
The Floating Rum Shack visits the Lost Spirits booth
Toward the end of the first day, I was watching Bryan explain the Lost Spirits story to someone. Standing next to me was an older gentleman, whom I soon realized hadn’t heard the whole Lost Spirits pitch, so I began explaining it to him. We soon exchanged names and only then did I realize it was Phil Prichard, of Prichard’s Distillery in Kelso, Tennessee. Talk about an honor!  Like Bryan, Phil is a maverick in the spirits industry, bucking the conventional wisdom and competing with the big guys. Mrs. Wonk and I had visited the distillery a few months back but hadn’t met Phil then, so meeting him at Rum Renaissance was an unexpected surprise. As Phil, Bryan, and I chatted, I realized that highly anticipated seminar by Richard Seale on rum categorization was starting momentarily, so the three of us hastily left to get seats.
Cocktail Wonk & Phil Prichard

Richard Seale at his presentation
Slide from the Richard Seale presentation
Like Bryan and Phil, Richard Seale of Foursquare Distilleryin Barbados has acquired a reputation as an iconoclast, a teller of hard truths about the rum industry. He’s best known for forcing the rum community to talk about the practice of adding sugar and other additives to rum without being labeled as such. Richard contends (and I agree) that there are artisanal rums being produced that are on equal footing with premium spirits like single malt scotch, but that rum as a category is held back by useless categorizations (e.g. “white”, “gold” and “dark,”) as well as shenanigans by the big players, including unlabeled additives. At the start of Richard’s session, each attendee was given four unlabeled rum samples with obviously different coloring.  Our task was to identify each sample – they all tasted nice enough, but were quite different from each other. The trick was on us however, as Richard revealed they were all the same rum, but with different flavorings added. Even the experts are fooled by this sort of chicanery. Among the key points Richard made is that the type of distillation matters, i.e. pot still, column still, and blends. The session wrapped up with a call to action: Rum producers need to decide whether to go the premium, regulated route like Scotch and Cognac, or whether (like vodka) rum’s value comes solely from marketing and packaging.
Toby Tyler, Cocktail Wonk, Joe Farrell at the Afrohead booth


Having reviewedthe Afrohead Seven-year rum recently, I was happy to have a long conversation with Afrohead’s founders, Toby Tyler and Joe Farrell from Harbor Island in the Bahamas. It’s clear that Afrohead is spending some serious marketing money to make an entrance into the rum category, including hosting a breakfast for the RumXP judges. Their booth included large images of the distinctive Afrohead logo, each highlighting a hidden symbol within the design. Among the fun moments of our conversation was when Toby showed me photos on his phone from his trip to the Angostura distillery blending room, where he works on Afrohead’s blends. We talked primarily about the 15 year which I hope to review here soon.

Mezan booth

Heaven Hill booth
This year, Rum Renaissance benefited from the addition of a “Trade Expo” portion only accessible to the media and trade, featuring a variety of interesting rums, most currently without US distribution. A special deal allowed these rums to be imported for sampling and allowed generous amounts of time for serious conversations with the producers without being swarmed by folks looking for yet another glass of rum punch or a free T-shirt.
 
John Barrett, Bristol Classic Rums
Just after entering the Trade Expo section, I spotted Bristol Classic Rums founder John Barrett at a table with a few of their rums. I bee-lined over for some quality time with John, primarily talking about the Bristol story. I already own two of the five Bristol Classic rums he had on display, including the Black Spiced which I reviewedearlier. The new (to me) Bristol expressions were a 1996 Caroni, a 2004 Barbados, and a 2004 Haitian, the latter of which was considered a thing of beauty by myself and several others.
 
Master blender “Don Pancho” Fernandez with family, Ron Duran booth
Authentic Caribbean Rum booth

Nearby was the Authentic Caribbean Rum (ACR) table. ACR is an alliance of rum producers who have strict standards about the quality of their rums. The table was lined with many top-notch rums I recognized–some by personal experience, other by extensive reading of rum blogs. Among the ACR table highlights for me was the St. Nicholas Abbey 5-year, the first aged expression created entirely at the distillery in Barbados. I own the St. Nicholas Abbey 10 and 15 as a result of visiting the distilleryin 2013; the 10- and 15-year were distilled by Foursquare and then sold to St. Nicholas Abbey, where they underwent additional aging. I found the St. Nicholas Abbey Five to be very smooth, with fewer acetone notes than I get from the 10 and 15 year. Other ACR highlights included the Hampden Gold and Monymusk (love my Jamaican funk!) and the Foursquare port cask-finished.
 

Skotlander Rum booth
Nine Leaves Rum booth

The Trade Expo area also featured much newer rum producers. Skotlander rum from Denmark showed several of their offerings, including an unaged (“raw”) white, an aged (“cask”) rum, and a sea buckthorn-infused rum (a berry-like fruit); I came away with 50ml bottles of the raw and sea buckthorn rum to noodle on later. With its beautiful bottles, the Nine Leaves rum from Japan caught my eye. They have an unaged white rum, as well as a number of different lightly aged versions, one using a California wine cask. I wish I could tell you more about how the Nine Leaves tasted, but my palate was fried by this point in the day—more news to come on those tastings.

Tito Cordero, Master Blender for Diplomatico
Wandering around the show floor on the second day, I spotted Tito Cordero, master blender for Diplomatico standing alone by the Diplomatico booth. I quickly took advantage of the opportunity and quizzed him about upcoming Diplomatico single vintage releases — the current being the 1997 and 2000 vintage. If I understood him correctly, he said that a 2002 will be coming out later this year.
 

Amrut booth
Bayou booth
Brugal booth

Something that surprised me as I circulated through the booths was the absence of certain really big players. Bacardi was not in attendance, notwithstanding a small presence in the “Rums of Puerto Rico” booth. Also missing were big dogs Appleton and Captain Morgan. However, without giant players dominating attention, the lesser known brands could shine – there were big, splashy booths from Plantation, Bayou, Afrohead, Rums of Puerto Rico, and others.

Boy Drinks World Bitters booth
Plantation VP Guillaume Lamy at the Plantation booth
With all these rummy people present, you’d (correctly) surmise that the evening activities would focus heavily on bars. A series of events at different locales (proclaimed as “Miami Cocktail Week”) provided a starting point for each evening, but the Broken Shakerwas where most of the rum industry ended up night after night. The Rum Line in South Beach was a big hit with Mrs. Wonk, the Lost Spirits folks, and myself on Friday. And Saturday night? Well, that was the famed Mai-Kaievening – a huge pile of the rummy crowd piled into charter bus headed to the Mai-Kai for a mind-blowing Tiki experience. So much to tell about that visit that I’m saving it for another post!

A Peek at Upcoming Plantation Rums at Rum Renaissance 2015

Within the rum world, Plantation is a dichotomy: A well-regarded purveyor of rums from around the world, but which makes no rum itself. A company with solid, readily available expressions that also continuously dabbles in special releases. A subsidiary of a well-regarded French Cognac producer, with a larger than life (and often shirtless) brand ambassador from Seattle.

Plantation inspires fierce loyalty among the rum crowd, due in large part to frequent limited releases and a strong outreach to rum aficionados like myself. Most recently, Plantation hosted breakfast at Rum Renaissance in Miami, where they shared details about upcoming releases. Invitees included all the Rum Renaissance 2015 judging panel, as well as a few other folks with strong ties to the rum community. I scored an invite and was thrilled to find myself sitting poolside on a hot, sunny Miami morning among so many well regarded rum writers, including but not limited to Robert Burr, Peter Holland of The Floating Rum Shack, Matt Robold from RumDood, Paul E. Senft  of Rum Journey, Bob Leonard of Bahama Bob’s Rumstyles, as well Tiki luminaries including Marie King (Tonga Hut) and Suzanne Long (Longitude), and a whole slew of other rum luminaries.

 

The welcome drink of choice was simple–Plantation 3 stars over ice. As the catered breakfast started up, guests gravitated towards a pineapple smoothie station and, nearly to a person, “fortified” their smoothie with a healthy pour of Plantation 5 from Barbados. Once settled in, Plantation vice president Guillaume Lamy launched into his presentation, with this factoid: Plantation currently has 5,000 barrels of rum in their inventory, primarily from Barbados. (The Plantation 5 Grande Reserve, the workhorse of the Plantation lineup, is sourced from Barbados, so no surprise there.)

Guilllaume Lamy providing rare pre-release samples to a thirsty crowd.
With the preliminaries covered, Guillaume turned to recent Plantation activity. First up was an update on Stiggins Fancy, a pineapple-infused rum created as a one-time, limited release of a 600 bottles for the 2014 Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans. Reaction to the Stiggins was immensely positive, and the very few bottles that made their way into private hands are highly coveted. Proceeds from this release were used to fund two bartender scholarships.

At the breakfast, we learned semi-officially (I’d heard prior rumors) that the Stiggins would become a regular part of the Plantation line.  Even more exciting, we breakfast folks got to experience Stiggins deconstructed, i.e. tasting the component elements prior to final blending, distillation, and aging. Starting with special Queen Victoria pineapples (flown in at great expense for freshness, rather than the more traditional shipping via slow boat), the rinds are separated from the flesh. The rinds are then macerated for eight weeks in 110 proof Plantation 3 Stars rum, which we sampled from a hand-labeled bottle. Although a bit more potent than the 3 Star I’m used to, it was a bit of an eye opener to see how much pineapple rinds can add to a rum.  The rind infusion, heavy with pineapple oils, is distilled again to create a pineapple “essence.”
Meanwhile, a batch of Plantation Original Dark rum from Trinidad  is infused with the pineapple flesh for three days; at this point, another hand-labeled bottle with the infused original dark appeared for our sampling pleasure. It was about what you’d expect a pineapple infusion of Original Dark to taste like, so no great surprise there.
After blending the rind essence and flesh infusions, the resulting mix is aged for two months in used cognac casks — medium toasted so as to minimize wood flavor extraction that wouldn’t mesh with the pineapple notes. Our third tasting was the final Stiggins product. Even though I’m sure everybody in attended had already at least sampled it several times, the pour of Stiggins was met with many smiles.
While enjoying our deconstructed samples, we learned that in February of this year, Plantation produced an additional 6,000 bottles of the Stiggins Fancy, which will be exclusive to the US market. Guillaume said that going forward, Plantation was planning to make 36,000 bottles twice a year, which should help the Stiggins shed its “unobtanium” nickname.
One of Plantation’s most rare, sought-after releases is the 1998 Guadeloupe, an agricole-style rhum that benefits nicely from its French vacation in used cognac barrels. Thus, when Guillaume brought out another hand-labeled bottle proclaiming Reunion Island (an agricole producing island), a ripple passed through the crowd. The bottle contained rhum aged for 12 years on Reunion Island, then shipped to the Plantation facility in Cognac for finishing in cognac and Madeira casks. And yes, it was delicious as expected, the grassy agricole funk elevated by the refined touch of sweetness from the Plantation finishing process. Guillaume said that a relatively small number of bottles had been made–with only 144 allocated to the North American market via SAQ in Canada.  A new unobtanium is born.
The next (rum-based) surprise was poured from another hand-labeled bottle indicating a blend of Jamaican and Guyanese rums – in and of themselves, a lovely pairing, but not particularly swoon-worthy, until Guillaume mentioned the blend had been finished in an Arran Whisky cask, giving it the smokey, peat character that you either love or hate (I love, thankfully).
Last, but certainly not least, we were treated to a special bottle, brought from Denmark by Johnny Drejer– A rare 1999 Plantation Jamaica port cask finish. The expected Jamaican funk was there, finishing with a typically sublime Plantation finish. As things were wrapping up after the final tasting, a bit of shirtless activity ensued…photos are withheld here to protect delicate eyes.
The three days prior to the breakfast, the RumXP judges underwent three days of rum tastings to select the top rums submitted in different categories. Although many of the judges were present at the breakfast, some of us didn’t yet know the results, so we were pleasantly surprised to learn that Plantation had earned four “Best in Class” honors and another four gold medals. With an ever-changing lineup of top quality, limited releases and their ongoing great engagement with the rum community, it’s easy to see how Plantation has become a big dog in the high-end rum category.

The Rum Collective December 2014 Plantation Single Casks Tasting Event in Seattle

Last week, I attended a tasting event at Wine World and Spirits in Seattle, introducing two new special-edition Plantation rums to the local market. Nicholas Feris, founder of the Rum Collective (a Seattle-based rum society) hosted over forty people for the event. Nicholas is an internationally known rum expert, blogger, and advocate, as well as a founding member of the International Rum Council (IRC). There’s no way I’d miss this event as I’m a big fan and collector of Plantation rums as well as their parent company, Cognac Ferrand.

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Five Great Multi-Heritage Rums

 

Within the spirits world, many liquors highlight their particular provenance – bourbon from Kentucky, Scotch whisky from, well, Scotland, cognac and calvados from France, tequila and mezcal from Mexico, and so on. However, you rarely see bottled blends of those spirits where the components are from different countries: Picture a blend of Irish whiskey and Kentucky bourbon – a bit odd, right? Or even Peruvian pisco and Chilean pisco – they’re quite different, and the rivalry between the countries about who makes the real pisco is heated. As you can imagine, they’re unlikely to appear in the same bottle together.

The rum world, with its relaxed, laissez-faire, no-rules attitude is the outlier – French Agricole AOC regulations notwithstanding, which is a story for another day. Sure, most rums hail from a single island or country, but there are also more than a few blended, multi-heritage rums.  For this list, I’m not talking about blending rums of different ages from the same distillery. Nor am I talking about rums originating from multiple stills, like Guyana’s El Dorado distillery uses for its higher end rums. The rums in this list are all a blend of rums from multiple countries.

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Plantation Rum Tasting with Alexandre Gabriel

The Elusive Plantation Rum Stiggins’s Fancy. Photo credit: Rumba.
World-wide rum sales are dominated by a handful of producers–the three goliaths of Bacardi, Captain Morgan, and McDowell’s, a rum made in India. The dominant thrust of Bacardi and Captain Morgan’s marketing is toward inexpensive rum with a fun, beach party atmosphere. For that reason, the rum-loving community (myself included) generally doesn’t focus on the big players. Instead, most of the attention goes to producers the average consumer hasn’t heard of, minuscule compared to the goliaths and perceived of higher quality and craft. Within the long tail of rum producers, one of the most respected is Plantation Rums. My personal collection contains more than a few of their offerings, so when Kate Perry of Seattle’s Rumba mentioned that Plantation Rum president and master distiller Alexandre Gabriel would be visiting Rumba to host a tasting, I practically lost my cookies, counting off the days till the event.
Within the spirits industry, there are two basic types of producers: those who distill and sell their product and those who buy distilled product from a distiller and then (hopefully) add their own stamp to the finished goods, typically via additional aging or blending. Plantation Rums is in the latter category, however don’t think that Plantation is merely reselling someone else’s rum.  – There’s a great story to tell about Plantation’s rums.
The Plantation rums are one of several product lines from Pierre Ferrand, a French company that got its start distilling cognac and today still creates some well-regarded cognac at very reasonable prices. Under the leadership of Alexandre Gabriel, Pierre Ferrand has expanded into several different spirits categories, including but not limited to cognac, rum, gin, and calvados. For the Plantation line, Alexandre purchases premium aged from established rum producers, mostly in the Caribbean, and then ships the rums to France where they undergo a second aging in used barrels sourced from the Cognac side of Ferrand’s operations. Some of the higher-end Plantation rums even go through a third aging (more on that in a bit). The less expensive Plantation rums are phenomenally priced and great for mixing. The more expensive, single vintage rums are outstanding sipping rums.
The primary person behind all this rummy goodness is Alexandre Gabriel, a Frenchman who initially was brought into assist the struggling Maison Ferrand Cognac with their sales, and today is the president, majority owner, and Master Blender. It was on a trip to the Caribbean that Alexandre sampled some rums and had the insight that finishing these rums in his previously used cognac casks could yield great results.  Plantation is now the realization of that vision. At this point the company has put out several dozen releases, and I’ve thought favorably of every one I’ve tried, so I was naturally very interested to meet Alexandre and hear him speak about rum.
Alexandre Gabriel being introduced at Rumba.
The tasting at Rumba was a mid-day event, attended primarily by Seattle area bartenders, but also by some of the local rum media, including Nicholas Ferris of The Rum Collective and yours truly. Short of Ferrand’s barrel house, you’d be hard pressed to find a better or more welcoming venue than Rumba, with its enormous rum collection extending all the way to the ceiling. Rumba GM Kate Perry and Bar Manager Jim Romdall co-hosted the event, including creating custom placemats for the tasting. In my case, the placemat became my de-facto notepad where I furiously scribbled notes:
Hastily scrawled notes.
After a brief introduction by Jim, Alexandre spoke for about ten minutes before getting to the five rums on the agenda for tasting:
  • Nicaragua 1998
  • Jamaica 2001
  • Panama 2000
  • Guadeloupe 1998
  • 20th Anniversary (Barbados)
The tasting lineup. Photo credit: Rumba.
On the placemat was a mysterious sixth spot without a tasting glass, with a lone pineapple image. Mid-way through the tasting, I saw Rocky Yeh, a very well-known portfolio ambassador and friend of Plantation Rum slip into a seat near the back with a single bottle. Could it be the very rare and coveted Stiggins’s Fancy? Yes! Suddenly the pineapple image made perfect sense. We were in for a bonus tasting of the Plantation pineapple rum that’s not for sale, and may never be for sale. More on this in a bit.

 

Alexandre Gabriel imparting the rum knowledge. Photo credit: Rumba.
Alexandre’s talk covered not only the rums we tasted, but also additional details about the Plantation aging and blending process, plus many more topics. It’s difficult to fit it all into a single-threaded narrative, so what follows below are the highlights I found interesting:
We must change to stay the same. While it’s fine to strive to recreate flavors from years past, it’s not as simple as slavishly using the same ingredients, because the ingredients themselves are changing.
Global warming affects how plants grow and how they taste. He gave the example of the taste of a particular grape, Folle Blanche, that has changed significantly over the past decades. As such, if we want to replicate old tastes, we must experiment with new techniques and starting materials.
Terroir means three things to Alexandre:  Two are well-accepted, the third may be debatable.
·       Soil and climate: This is well established and generally accepted.
·       Environment: For example, during aging in a wet cellar, the alcohol content will evaporate more quickly, whereas in a dry cellar, the water content evaporates faster, which obviously affects the resulting flavors. Another example he offered is that a freshly painted cellar room can affect the eventual flavor in a negative way.
·       Local know-how: The way people do things during the production process. Alexandre believes this is part of terroir, but accepts that some may disagree.
A new cognac barrel can cost in the $1,000 price range, whereas a used barrel may only fetch $30. This was one reason why Alexandre was looking for ways to reuse his own barrel stock. Plantation Rum is now a big consumer of its sibling’s cognac barrels, but used barrel supply still exceeds demand.
Cognac is like classical music. The score has already been written, i.e. there are all sorts of rules and regulations, so cognac is mostly about how the music is “played.” In contrast, rum is “anything goes.” The lack of rules allows for much more new techniques and experimentation.
American oak barrels provide the whiskey lactone, also known as the coconut/vanilla flavor you often get from spirits aged in it.
Most rum that Plantation buys from the Caribbean is aged five to ten years, and only 65 percent of it remains in the barrel due to the angel’s share (evaporation).
Adding water to a spirit can release smells and flavors. However, that reaction really only happens once, so it should happen immediately prior to serving. To minimize flavor release during dilution prior to bottling, Plantation takes special steps including introducing water very slowly, as well as letting the water first sit for a while in a cognac cask.
During distillation, the “tails,” which are the chemical compounds that boil at a higher temperature than ethanol and hence come later in the distillation, are what give a rum its particular character. As such, some amount of the tails is usually included in the finished product.
The rum producers of Barbados– Mount Gay, Foursquare, etc.–have perfected the blending of pot and column still rums, creating light rums that have lots of character.
Spanish rums came to the party relatively late, primarily because during rum’s formative years, Spanish parts of the Caribbean were still consuming spirits from Spain. By the time the Spanish-held territories started producing rum, the column still had been invented and was more efficient than pot stills. Thus, rums from Spanish territories are typically made in column stills, so are relatively light.
The Jamaican rum distilleries have perfected the high-ester rum. Distilleries do all sorts of crazy things in the fermentation process to introduce compounds that eventually become the characteristic funky esters. Alexandre said that one Jamaican distiller told him he’s added goat’s heads to the mash. (I’d already heard of bat carcasses being used.) For more on this particular topic, see this prior post of mine. (For the record, Mrs. Wonk prefers her rums without goat heads or bat carcasses.)
Plantation is currently experimenting with high ester rums from other regions beyond Jamaica. The esters in these rums have different flavor characteristics than the dominant Jamaican rum. I can’t wait for these to show up and experience the differences
The French Agricole style, which uses sugar cane juice rather than molasses as a starting point, came about because of war between England and France. In the early 1800s, England blockaded France’s trade routes with the Caribbean, leaving the French territories with no place to sell their sugar. As a result, they started distilling rum from the cane juice.  Voila!Rhum agricole.
Plantation has released an agricole-style rum (the Guadeloupe, which we sampled), but it can’t be labeled as such because it doesn’t meet the French AOC regulations. I found the Guadeloupe rum had the distinctive agricole flavor, but more refined and very “Plantation-like” in taste – Smooth and slightly sweet.
Plantation uses the elevageprocess for aging, which is much more labor intensive than simply putting the rum in a barrel and letting it rest for some number of years.  Plantation’s process includes sampling sixty to eighty barrels a day to frequently assess how they’re coming along and possibly making changes along the way. For instance, if a particular barrel begins to get a certain characteristic that’s impacted by wood, the barrel may be emptied, a single stave replaced, and the barrel refilled to continue aging. Another less drastic example would be moving the barrel from one warehouse to another to provide a different environment.
Some higher-end Plantation rums, typically the “black label” editions, are aged a third time in a different type of cask, frequently one having held Pineau des Charentes, a sweet liqueur made from blending aged cognac with fresh grape juice. I find the flavor added by Pineau cask aging to be among my favorite rum tastes.
Plantation Rums has put out many releases, only some of which are available in the U.S. Sometimes the issue is simply that relatively small amounts are made, but frequently the trouble lies with the U.S. TTB (Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau), which imposes strict and often arbitrary restrictions that make some releases difficult to import into the U.S.

 

Portfolio Ambassador Rocky Yeh. Stiggins’s Fancy in background.
Near the end of the presentation, we finally got to the Stiggins’s Fancy rum. It’s a pineapple-infused rum that came about from a collaboration between Alexandre and David Wondrich, a true cocktail-world treasure and my favorite spirits writer. Only a relatively few bottles of Stiggins’s Fancy were produced, as it’s very expensive (tiny, very expensive Queen Victoria pineapples are used) and time consuming to make. The Stiggins’s was first seen at a Plantation-hosted event at Tales of the Cocktail this year, and the few bottles out in the wild now are highly treasured. So far, I’ve not been able to lay my hands on one. Thus, I was elated that Rocky Yeh was able to supply a bottle, which we all got to sample. Simply stated: It’s out-of-control amazing. Many folks are pushing Alexandre to formally release the Stiggins’s, but at the time of the Rumba event, Alexandre still hadn’t decided if it was economically viable to produce on a larger scale.
Rumba Bar Manager Jim Romdall introducing the rum map.
As part of the tasting, Rumba launched their rum map, wherein once you try a certain number of rums from various regions (sixty rums in total), you receive a DTO  or “Daiquiri Time Out” coin, which entitles you to a daiquiri upon future visits. For this event, attendees were able to use the rums we tasted to fill slots in our newly started rum maps. Very nice!
Cocktail Wonk and Alexandre Gabriel. Photo credit: Nicholas Ferris.
After the formal event wound down, I was able to speak with Alexandre individually for about twenty minutes, during which I peppered him with questions and clarifications. He seemed genuinely happy to answer and even told me a few things followed up by, “But don’t blog that,” a request I’ve tried hard to honor here. I left the event with my head spinning from all the things I learned, and even more excited than before to see what Plantation Rums does next.
Alexandre Gabriel, Jim Romdall and Kate Perry at Rumba. Photo credit: Rumba.