Lost Spirits to release a third rum – Cuban Style

As followers of this blog know, I’m a big fan of Lost Spirits Distillery and their very scientific approach to understanding and then optimizing each phase of rum making to make exactly the flavor profile they’re targeting. While already receiving rave reviews and awards for the first rum iteration, Navy Style, they’ve recently released a second iteration, Polynesian Inspired rum. For those of us who don’t live in California it’s been might tough to get our hands on the  Polynesian, as the only distributor who had it initially doesn’t ship anywhere, including Washington State where I live.

A few days ago I finally got my hands on three bottles of the Polynesian Inspired Rum. After trying it out I hit up Bryan Davis, co-owner and mastermind of Lost Spirits Distillery, for details about how he makes the Polynesian style different than the Navy Style. What started as a simple question ended up being a 90+ minute Skype call where he walked me through his presentation at the Miami Rum Renaissance, as well as answering a whole bunch of other questions I had about his process and the distillery itself. Coming off the call I knew there was way too good information to cram into just one very long, rambling post so I’m breaking what I learned into several posts.

For this post, the big news Bryan gave me the OK to share is that Lost Spirits Distillery will be releasing a third style of rum within the next month or so, a Cuban Style that will be drier than the Navy and Polynesian. Bryan says the wood does more of the talking in this rum while the fermentation components do less. I’m sure the Cuban will be a Tour de Force of flavor much like the first two, and my next quest is to get ahold of a bottle of it. Bryan anticipates that the Cuban style may even supplant the Navy Style in popularity. Bonus tip: If you run into someone wearing a Lost Spirits shirt at Tales of the Cocktail 2014 in New Orleans next month, flag them down and you may be able to score a sample!

Update on Lost Spirits Polynesian Inspired Rum

Yesterday I posted my thoughts on Lost Spirits Navy Style rum, of which I’m big fan of. In the post I mentioned that a Polynesian Inspired rum is also forthcoming. However, while it’s been teased for a while, including this review, I haven’t been able to figure out when I could buy it.

Well, as luck would have it I had a brief email back-and-forth with the distiller, Bryan Davis today. He answered both of my questions. Here’s what I learned:

1) The Polynesian Inspired version should hit the shelf in 3 weeks to a month. In my book, that’s mid-May, 2014. I’ll be grabbing a number of bottles as soon as I get the chance!

2) I was hoping for a some details on the difference approaches/methods used between the Navy Style and Polynesian Inspired versions. While I didn’t get any juicy tidbits, Brian said that he will cover these differences in his upcoming talk at the Miami Rum Renaissance Festival. Sadly, I’m not attending, but luckily for us rum nerds, Bryan says he’ll be uploading the video of his talk to Youtube.

The importance of storytelling – Lost Spirits Navy Style Rum


I frequently make new and unusual cocktails for guests at my house. Something I’ve come to enjoy is telling a story about every drink I make. Maybe it’s the unusual spirit I’ve just acquired, perhaps an unusual combination of ingredients, or a tale of how a particular bottle came to reside in my bar. My wife and I occasionally do cocktail-themed dinner parties – friends know them as “Rumpocalypse”, and every drink gets a few minutes about its background and why I chose it. Telling people about what they’ve got in front of them creates a personal connection and often emboldens them to share their thoughts about the drink, which is helpful for me in knowing how to craft an even better experience for them.

Likewise, I use slow times at bars to connect with the bartenders, asking “Is there anything interesting you’re working on?” This often yields something off-menu and that the bartender is eager to talk about. When the drink arrives I ask them to tell me a story about it. Done at the right time, e.g not during a slammed Saturday night, you’ll often have an experience you otherwise might miss.

Recently, a story that grabbed me and which I enjoy sharing, is rum from Lost Spirits Distillery. Currently there are two iterations, both “Navy style”, at 55% and 68% ABV. The story of these rums is great for several reasons. First, they have a strong, dark, forceful flavor, very much in the Jamaican style with a ton of “esters”, which are a chemical compound that provides all sorts of flavors. In the case of Jamaican style rums, I find these esters to have a pleasant, fruit-like flavor like plum, raisin or banana.  The Lost Spirits rums are a dark red hue. You can easily imagine a pirate drinking it in the 1700s.

Next, although the flavor of these rums screams Jamaican or someplace else deep in the Caribbean, they’re actually made in Monterey, California, not far from where I grew up and went to college. I frequently drove through the farm fields in the region, and never once saw sugar cane, so the thought of a rum distillery there seems a bit alien, but very cool. These days many distilleries don’t grow their own sugar cane, and instead import molasses from elsewhere. What gives Lost Spirits an edge here is that they use baking grade molasses, which has more sugars than molasses that’s been refined more times to extract as much sucrose as possible.

Finally, and most importantly, the Lost Spirits story appeals to me because of science! While rum aficionados have come to expect that a deep flavorful rum needs to spend many years in the barrel, Lost Spirits uses deep knowledge of the chemical processes in play during fermentation, distillation and aging to focus and concentrate the flavor producing process.

A couple of examples:  During the fermentation process, distiller Bryan Davis deprives the yeast of nitrogen, thereby weakening the cell walls and stressing the yeast. Quoting him: “…properly managed the yeast can produce as many short chained esters as the first few years in a cask.” As for barrel aging, Bryan optimizes his cask preparation to get the goodness of long barrel aging in a shorter period of time. Again quoting: “We use a controlled charring process incorporating heat, flame, and even special frequencies of light to break the compounds we want out fast.” The full description of all the science (highly entertaining for a wonk like me) can be found here.

To my taste and sensibilities, the most natural comparison to the 55% ABV version is Smith & Cross. They have similar alcohol contents (55% vs 57%). The Lost Spirits is darker, with less fruit on the nose and palate than the Smith & Cross. In place of the fruit, I taste more of the molasses. The best simple description I have for the Lost Spirits taste is somewhere between Smith & Cross and Lemon Hart 151. There are several well-written reviews out there with more tasting notes, including here and here.

Although I can ease into sipping the Lost Spirits with its high alcoholic content, I prefer to use it in relatively simple drinks where its unique flavor elements stand out, rather than a multi-rum tiki concoction.  It certainly works well in tiki, but for something this special and relatively rare, I make sure to enjoy every drop to the fullest.

I’ve read that Lost Spirits Distillery has another style of rum on the way, this one being Polynesian inspired. Given my experience with the Navy Style, I’m grabbing as much of the Polynesian expression as I can as soon as it’s available!

My go-to recipe using Lost Spirits Navy Style rum is a variation of the Scarr Power from Rumba in Seattle. Rumba’s Scarr Power uses Smith & Cross and I simply swap in the Lost Spirits 55%. Much as I enjoy the Smith&Cross-based original, the Lost Spirits version is just fantastic.

  • 1.5 oz Lost Spirits Navy Style rum, 55% ABV 
  • .75 oz fresh squeezed lime juice 
  • .5 oz 2:1 Nutmeg syrup 

Add all ingredients to a small glass. Add a large ice cube or two, stir gently. Garnish with orange peel if desired.

I deliberately don’t shake this drink, so as to keep the dilution to a minimum. I also use a small old-fashion glass, ~ 5 oz, so that a single large ice cube is nearly submerged and providing just enough chilling and dilution as the drink is slowly consumed.