Guadeloupe’s Rhum GI and How it Compares to Martinique’s AOC

Rum regulations (aka GIs) are a favorite topic here on Cocktail Wonk. My ever-growing archive of GI-related stories, including the Jamaica and Martinique GIs is here, and it’s time to add to that list!

While Martinique’s appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) has significant mindshare in the rhum/rhum/ron world, the rhum regulations of Guadeloupe, its sister French overseas department, do not. If you need to brush up on our understanding of GIs, I suggest reading my GI Fast Facts before continuing.

Since Guadeloupe’s full GI is quite verbose and full of mini-numbing minutia, I’ve summarized the essential elements, and in English! We’ll follow that by comparing the Guadeloupe and Martinique regulations, and finish up with a full English language translation for the masochists among you.

Note: Guadeloupe is an archipelago and administrative district incorporating several islands, including Guadeloupe island and Marie Galante. Rhum made on both islands falls under the Guadeloupe regulations.

Guadeloupe GI Summary

In brief, the key elements of Guadeloupe’s rhum GI are as follows:

1. Name and category of the spirit drink bearing the geographical indication

The label wording ‘Rhum of Guadeloupe’ or ‘Rhum de Guadeloupe’ or ‘Rhum Guadeloupe’ is registered with the European Commission. (In French: Rhum de la Guadeloupe)

2. Description of the spirit drink

There are several types of rhums, distinguished by their production methods:

  • White rhum (le rhum blanc)
  • Dark rhum (le rhum brun)
  • Rhum aged in oak (le rhum élevé sous bois)
  • Old rhum (le rhum vieux)

2.1 Organoleptic characteristics

White rhum is colorless and transparent, sometimes with slight gold tones. It smells fruity, floral, vegetal, spicy, empyreumatic, and balsamic.

“Dark” rhum and “aged in oak” rhums have a golden to amber color with a woody character and fruity, floral, vegetal, spicy, empyreumatic, and balsamic aromas.

“Vieux” rhum has a dark mahogany honey colour and woody, fruity, spicy, empyreumatic, and balsamic aromas.

2.2 Main physical and chemical characteristics

Guadeloupe rhum must have at least 225 gr/hlAA of volatile substances other than ethyl and methyl alcohol. “Vieux” rhum must have at least 325 gr/hlAA of volatile substances.

Rhums must have a minimum strength of 40 percent ABV.

3. Definition of the geographical area

The growing and processing of sugarcane, distillation, aging and bottling of rhums must occur within the geographic area of Guadeloupe.

To use the additional “Marie Galante” designation, the above must occur within designated towns on Marie Galante.

4. Description of the method of obtaining

4.1 Sugarcane
Sugarcane must be of variety Saccharhum officinarhum or Saccharhum spontaneum, or their hybridization. A new variety must be grown for at least three years before it can be used to make rhum. Transgenic varieties are disallowed.

4.2 Juice extraction
Juice extraction is via mechanical pressure from horizontal mills and imbibition with cane juice.

4.3 Mash preparation (aka “must”)
The fermented source material must be either cane juice, or diluted cane syrup/molasses.

The use of “agricole” on a label alongside “Rhum of Guadeloupe” is only allowed for cane juice rhum. Cane juice cannot be limed when making agricole rhum. Cane juice cannot be augmented with sugar sources such as cane syrup or molasses.

4.4 Mash fermentation
Fermentation must be batch, not continuous.

4.5 Distillation
The distillation of fermented mash (“cane wine”) must be one of the following:

  • simple batch distillation
  • multistage batch distillation
  • multistage continuous distillation with reflux.

The resulting distillate must be 90 percent ABV or less at 20°C and have at least 225 gr/hlAA of volatile substances.

Discontinuous single distillation
Distillation in a Charentais style pot still with kettle capacity of 3,000 liters or less. The cane wine in the kettle is heated by open flame or an outer steam jacket.

The heads and tails may be redistilled with the wash of subsequent distillations.

Multi-stage batch distillation (Hybrid still)
Distillation in a Charentais style still topped with a column of not more than 25 plates.

Continuous multi-stage distillation with reflux
Distillation in a continuous column:

  • The stripping portion must have at least 15 plates.
  • The rectification portion must have no more than 50 plates.

4.6 Aging

  • White rhums are matured in vats for a minimum of three weeks.
  • Dark rhums are aged in oak containers for a minimum of six months.
  • Raised in wood rhums (élevé sous-bois) are aged in oak containers for a minimum of 12 months.
  • Old rhums are aged in oak casks with a maximum capacity of 650 liters for a minimum of three years.

4.7 Finishing
Finishing methods which obscure the rhum by two percent or less are allowed. Obscuration, primarily expected to be from wood solid extraction and/or caramel coloring, is the percentage difference between the real and apparent alcoholic strength, measured in ABV.

5. Evidence of the connection with the geographical environment

5.1 Natural factors
The Guadeloupe archipelago has a hot and humid climate with a dry season, and a rainy season, usually with more than five hours a day of sunshine and more than ten days of rain per month.

Guadeloupe sugarcane grows in soil that is 95 percent deep clay. All of Marie-Galante is on limestone with shallower soils.

5.2 Human factors
Sugarcane is part of the cultural heritage of Guadeloupe. The knowledge of sugarcane farmers has been supplemented by a cane and sugar technical center for over 50 years.

Sugarcane grows on 15,000 hectares within Guadeloupe and protects the soil from erosion.

5.5 Causal link
Guadeloupe’s hot, humid climate and clay soil are good for growing sugarcane; Marie Galante’s limestone has its own distinct impact on sugarcane.

8. Possible geographical indications or additional labeling rules

Additional geographical names
The label wording, “Rhum of Guadeloupe” may be supplemented with “Marie-Galante” for rhums meeting the criteria defined in section 3.

Additional information
The label wording ‘Rhum of Guadeloupe” may be supplemented by the words “blanc” and “brun”, “élevé sous-bois”, or “vieux”, after which follow the words “agricole” or “de sucrerie”, for rhums meeting the respective requirements defined earlier.

The following words may supplement the word “vieux” based on these criteria:

  • The words “VO”, “Très Vieux”, “Very Old”, for rhums aged at least 3 years
  • “VSOP”, “Vieille Réserve”, “Réserve Spéciale”, “Cuvée Spéciale”, for rhums aged at least 4 years
  • “Grande Réserve”, “Extra Vieux”, “Extra Old”, “XO”, “Hors d’Age”, for rhums aged at least 6 years
  • The mention “millésime” (vintage) followed by the mention of one year for rhums aged at least 6 years.

How does Guadeloupe’s GI differ from the Martinique AOC?

Despite their close proximity and shared status as French Overseas Territories, the respective Guadeloupe and Martinique regulations, have a slightly different scope. By scope, I mean the critical but arcane territory of intellectual property law.

Guadeloupe’s regulations are a Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), whereas Martinique’s AOC is a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO.) I won’t attempt to explain them here, and instead direct you to the aforementioned GI Fast Facts story.

From a birds-eye view, the two regulations are structured similarly, and have many common aspects. However, Guadeloupe’s GI allows a broader range of production choices, including the use of molasses.

Let’s start with the key differences:

Geographic Area

Martinique has specific parts of the island where rhum production can occur. Guadeloupe allows production anywhere on Guadeloupe island. Marie Galante has locale restrictions.

Source Material

Guadeloupe allows cane juice, cane syrup, or molasses. Martinique only allows cane juice. If a Guadeloupe rhum is to use “agricole” on the label, it must derive exclusively from cane juice.

Fermentation

Martinique has requirements on the maximum fermentation batch size, duration, and final ABV of the wash. Guadeloupe only requires batch that fermentation, with no additional constraints.

Distillation technology

Whereas Martinique only allows distillation in a tightly defined “creole” column configuration, Guadeloupe allows the following:

  • Charentais style pot still (similar to a Cognac still).
  • A Charentais style still with a short concentration column on top
  • One or more columns, with constraints on the number of stripping and rectifying plates

Other Distillation Constraints

Martinique allows distillation only during certain parts of the year. Guadeloupe has no such restrictions.

Guadeloupe allows distillation up to 90 percent ABV. Martinique requires distillation to between 65 and 75 percent ABV.

Aging

While blanc (white), élevé sous-bois (raised in wood), and vieux designations exist on both islands, Guadeloupe adds a “brown” category. Such rhum must rest in an oak container for at least six months, as compared to a minimum of twelve months for élevé sous-bois.

There are slight differences in allowed age-related definitions, e.g. VO, VSOP, Vieux, XO, etc.…

What’s the same

  • The same family of yeasts are allowed
  • Cane juice fermentations cannot be augmented with cane syrup or molasses
  • New make distillate must have at least 225 gr/hlAA of volatile substances, and aged rhum must have at least 325 gr/hlAA.
  • Both allow “finishing methods”, e.g. caramel, resulting in obscuration of 2% or less.
  • The final product must be at least 40 percent ABV.

The Unabridged Guadeloupe GI

We have Benoit Bail to thank for his work in translating full Guadeloupe’s GI into English. I have included an extremely lightly edited version of Benoit’s original below. (Primarily just some spelling and formatting changes, and a few notes of clarification. Any mistakes are mine.)

SPECIFICATIONS GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION

“Rhum de la Guadeloupe” or “Rhum de Guadeloupe” or “Rhum Guadeloupe »

(Translated by Benoit Bail – Minor edits by Matt Pietrek)

Part I Data Sheet

  1. Name and category of the spirit drink bearing the geographical indication

The geographical indication ‘Rhum de la Guadeloupe’ or ‘Rhum de Guadeloupe’ or ‘Rhum Guadeloupe’ is registered in Annex III to Regulation (EC) No 110/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 January 2008 in the category of rhum spirit drinks Annex II, point 1.

It is a traditional rhum as defined in point 1 (f) of Annex II of Regulation (EC) No. 110/2008.

2. Description of the spirit drink

Depending on the production conditions, several types of products are distinguished:

  • rhum blanc (white rhum)
  • rhum brun (brown rhum)
  • rhum élevé sous bois
  • rhum vieux (aged rhum)

2.1 Organoleptic characteristics

Blanc:
“Blanc” rhum is colorless and transparent, with sometimes light golden to amber reflections. It is olfactory pleasant. It is characterized by its aromatic finesse with fruity, floral, vegetal, and spicy notes as well as empyreumatic and balsamic series. [Note: empyreumatic means the odor of burnt organic matter.]

Brun and élevé sous bois:
“brun” rhum and “élevé sous bois” rhum have a golden to amber color. They are marked by their woody character and by fruity, floral, vegetal, spicy notes as well as by empyreumatic and balsamic series.

Vieux:
“Vieux” rhum has a dark mahogany honey color and woody, fruity, spicy, empyreumatic, and balsamic aromas.

2.2 Main physical and chemical characteristics

Rhum contains a total amount of volatile substances other than ethyl and methyl alcohols higher than or equal to 225 grams per hectolitre of pure alcohol.

“Vieux” rhum has a content of volatile substances other than ethyl and methyl alcohols higher or equal to 325 grams per hectolitre of pure alcohol.

The minimum alcoholic strength by volume of rhums on the market is 40%.

3. Definition of the geographical area

Production of plant material for plantations, production and harvesting of sugarcane, extraction and storage of cane juice and cane sugar by-products (molasses or syrups), fermentation of the must then its distillation, maturation , aging, and the storage of rhums are made in the geographical area of the territory of the department of Guadeloupe.

In order to benefit from the complementary name ‘Marie Galante’, the production, the harvesting of sugar cane, the extraction and storage of cane juice and products derived from the manufacture of cane sugar (molasses or syrups), the fermentation of the must then its distillation, maturation, aging and the storage of rhums are carried out on the territory of the following towns of the department of Guadeloupe: Capesterre- de-Marie-Galante, Grand-Bourg, Saint- Louis.

4. Description of the method of obtaining

4.1 The sugarcane
The sugarcane varieties belong to the species Saccharhum officinarhum and Saccharhum spontaneum or from their hybridization.

They are subject to acclimatization, multiplication, and selection in the geographical area for a minimum period of three years.

Transgenic sugarcane varieties are prohibited.

4.2 Juice extraction
Juice extraction is done by mechanical pressure and soaking with cane water. The sugar canes are crushed and pressed in horizontal mills.

4.3 The production of the must [Note: aka “mash”]
The must intended for fermentation consists of either:

  • Cane juice
  • The syrups or molasses, resulting from the different stages of the transformation of the cane juice into sugar, diluted with water

The must intended for the production of “Rhum de la Guadeloupe” supplemented with the mention “agricole” comes exclusively from cane juice. Liming this juice is forbidden. The use of any technique for enriching the cane juice or must made from it, particularly by adding syrup, molasses, or sugar, is prohibited.

The must intended for the production of “Rhum de la Guadeloupe” completed with the mention “de sucrerie” comes exclusively from syrups or molasses resulting from the various stages of the processing of cane juice into sugar.

4.4 The fermentation of the must
Fermentation is discontinuous.

4.5 Distillation
The distillation of fermented must, commonly known as “wine”, is carried out according to the principles of simple batch distillation, multistage batch distillation or multistage continuous distillation with reflux.

At the conclusion of the distillation process, rhums shall have an alcoholic strength by volume of less than 90% at 20° C and a sum of volatile substances other than ethyl and methyl alcohols higher than or equal to 225 grams per hectolitre of pure alcohol at the end of the distillation process.

Discontinuous single distillation
The distillation is made in a pot still composed of a boiler, a capital, a gooseneck, with or without a wine cooler or water condenser, and a coil with a cooling apparatus.

The capacity of the boiler must not exceed 30 hectoliters.

The “wine” is heated in the boiler by open fire or by introducing condensed water into an outer double jacket.

The vapors from the “wine” rise and reach the capital where they partially condense. Some of them flow back to the boiler after condensation while another part of the vapors borrows the gooseneck and goes to the refrigerant at the exit of which will flow the distillate.

The process may consist of two distillations:

  • The first is the distillation of the “wine” and makes it possible to obtain the first distillate, after having discarded the products of beginning and end of the distillation (heads and tails)
  • The second distillation, so-called “repasse” consists of the distillation of the first distillate and makes it possible to obtain the spirit.

The alcoholic strength by volume of the distillate decreases during the distillation and the start and end fractions of distillation may be separated according to their alcoholic strength by volume and added to the wine or first distillate of a subsequent distillation.

Multi-stage batch distillation
The distillation is made in a still composed of a boiler surmounted by a concentration column, a capital, a gooseneck, with or without a wine cooler or water condenser, and a coil with cooling device.

The “wine” is heated in the boiler by open fire or by introducing water vapors in an outer double jacket. The column is composed of a vapor concentration zone with not more than 25 plates.

The demotion is performed by one or more water heaters or water condensers.

The vapors from the “wine” rise and reach the capital where they partially condense.

Some of them flow back to the boiler after condensation while another part of the vapors goes to the column through the concentration plates of alcohol vapors and goes to the coil at the exit of which will flow the distillate.

Continuous multi-stage distillation with reflux
The distillation is carried out by means of columns which contain plates ensuring through bubbling elements, in the form of tunnels or caps, the contact between the liquid flows and the gas flows which cross each-other.

The columns include a zone of exhaustion of “wine” in alcohol and a zone of concentration within which the vapors will be enriched in alcohol.

The distilling apparatus is composed of one or more columns comprising:

  • a depletion zone of at least 15 plates.
  • an area of concentration of 50 plates at most.

The condensation is made by one or more water heaters or water condensers. The condensates from these heat exchangers are directed either towards the casting of the distillate or downshifted at the top of the concentration zone.

Undesirable compounds (heads and tails) can be removed in the tailings or in the atmosphere by degassing the “wine” in the depletion zone, as well as by liquid phase extractions in the concentration zone.

4.6 Aging
Rhums intended for the production of “blanc” rhum are matured in vats for a minimum period of 3 weeks between distillation and conditioning.

Rhums intended for the production of “brun” rhum are aged in an oak container for a minimum period of 6 months.

Rhums intended for the production of “élevé sous-bois” rhum are aged in an oak container for a minimum period of 12 months.

Rhums intended for the production of “vieux” rhum are aged in oak barrels with a maximum capacity of 650 liters for a minimum period of three years.

The minimum periods defined above are respected without interruption, with the exception of the necessary manipulations to produce the products.

4.7 Finishing

The finishing methods are allowed in such a way that their effect on the darkness of the rhum is less than 2% vol. The obscuration notably linked to the extraction of the wood or to the adaptation of the coloring by the addition of caramel, expressed in % vol., is obtained by the difference between the actual alcoholic strength by volume and the gross alcoholic strength by volume.

5. Evidence of the connection with the geographical environment

5.1 Natural factors

Located in the tropical zone at 16 ° north, the Guadeloupe archipelago enjoys a generally hot and humid climate where two marked seasons are distinguished, a dry season and a rainy season, with generally more than 5 hours of sunshine per day and more than 10 days of rain per month. There is no risk of frost.

The cane hearth in Guadeloupe is installed on plots resting at 95% on deeply clayey soils (vertissols), smectite soils and ferralitic soils. The small island of Marie-Galante has the distinction of resting entirely on a limestone base from which derives shallower soils.

5.2 Human factors
Many rural landscapes are made of cane fields. This plant is part of the cultural heritage of the archipelago. The know-how of sugarcane producers in Guadeloupe, which has been supported for more than half a century by the cane and sugar technical center, has made it possible to adapt crops on a case-by-case basis.

Sugarcane contributes to the protection of soil against erosion and the protection of its environment through limited use of inputs through its sustainability and hedging capacity.

The cultivation of sugarcane occupies 15,000 hectares of the useful agricultural area of the Guadeloupe archipelago and is often the main production in more than 5,000 farms.

These canes are valued in three distilleries of “rhum de sucreries”, and nine distilleries of agricole rhums. The sugarcane – rhum industry offers over 10,000 direct and indirect jobs.

5.3 Historical elements
Since the seventeenth century, various technological innovations have led to the current “Rhum de la Guadeloupe”. At first, the cultivation of cane was developed with the aim of producing sugar. As early as the 1645s, the monarchy supported sugar production in Guadeloupe. This developed at the same time as the production of cane spirits. This is the era of the sugar plantations, resulting from a first transfer of European know-how by the first settlers, including those from other countries in the Americas, including Brazil.

Most of the sugars and spirits obtained were shipped and marketed in metropolitan France, where sugar was refined, and rhum cut, especially in Bordeaux, Nantes, and La Rochelle.

A second technology transfer occurred around the middle of the 19th century with the arrival of the steam engine and distillation columns. The steam emitted was used to distill the rhums through a column, equipped with several metal plates, 3, 4, 10, or more depending on the case. Steam also provided motive power for the

grinding mills, which became entirely metallic. The distillation columns made it possible to considerably increase the treated volumes.

Guadeloupe distillers gradually perfected their manufacturing techniques. Following the work of Pasteur and the improvement of hygienic conditions, special attention was given to fermentations.

At the end of the 19th century, the modernization of production tools continued, and the production units specialized more and more. Agricole distilleries were usually smaller in size compared to factories which had a sugar refinery and a distillery.

Better structured and more efficient in the face of the strong demand for rhum, especially during the first world war, the production of rhum from Guadeloupe reached peaks in the early twentieth century. Thus, in 1922 the French authorities decided to regulate the production of rhum of Guadeloupe, by quota the quantity of rhum of Guadeloupe sold with tax exemption in metropolitan France, and by defining the specific analytical criteria of rhum.

In 1922, two-thirds of the production consisted of molasses rhum and one-third of agricole rhum. Agricole rhum found trade opportunities within Guadeloupe quite easily, while cheaper rhum was more often exported to metropolitan France.

Both kinds of rhum are always produced in the same proportion. Today, rhum production has been structured through the establishment of the cane – sugar – rhum sector.

Today, the rhums of Guadeloupe are represented in metropolitan France under different brands known and sought after by consumers and are also exported to more than 40 countries.

5.4 Characteristics of rhum attributable to the geographical area
The white “Rhum de la Guadeloupe” is colorless and transparent, with sometimes light golden to amber reflections. It is pleasantly olfactory. It is characterized by its aromatic finesse with fruity, floral, vegetal, and spicy notes as well as empyreumatic and balsamic series.

The “Rhum de la Guadeloupe” brun and élevé sous-bois, have a golden to amber color. They are marked by a woody character and by fruity, floral, vegetal, spicy notes as well as by empyreumatic and balsamic series.

The aged “Rhum de la Guadeloupe” has a dark mahogany honey color and woody, fruity, spicy, empyreumatic, and balsamic aromas.

5.5 Causal link
The pedoclimatic conditions of Guadeloupe, hot and humid climate, clay soil, are particularly conducive to the cultivation of sugarcane, the limestone soils of the island of Marie-Galante bringing a certain specificity.

The quality of the rhums produced from the local cane is inseparable from the Guadeloupean arts of fermentation, distillation and aging of rhum.

For nearly four centuries, distillers in Guadeloupe have continuously sought to improve the quality of rhums, resulting in their reputation and international reputation.

6. Possible requirements to be complied under European and / or national provisions

7. Name and address of the applicant

Organisme de Défense et de Gestion des rhums traditionnels des Départements d’Outre Mer sous indications géographiques
7 rue de Madrid
75008 PARIS
cirt.dom@wanadoo.fr 0143871265

8. Possible geographical indications or additional labeling rules

Additional geographical names:

The geographical indication ‘Rhum de la Guadeloupe’ may be supplemented on labels by the geographical name ‘Marie-Galante’ for rhums which comply with the conditions defined in point 3. Geographical area.

Additional information:

The geographical indication ‘Rhum de la Guadeloupe’ may be supplemented by the words ‘blanc’ and ‘brun’, ‘élevé sous-bois’, or ‘vieux’, to which may be added the words ‘agricole’ or ‘de sucrerie’, for rhums meeting the production conditions laid down for those particulars in points I-2.1, 2.2 and point 4 (must production) in these specifications.

Aging notes:

The following statements relating to a length of aging may only supplement the word “vieux” under the following conditions:

  • the words “VO”, “Très Vieux”, “Very Old”, for rhums aged at least 3 years.
  • “VSOP”, “Vieille Réserve”, “Réserve Spéciale”, “Cuvée Spéciale”, for rhums aged at least 4 years.
  • “Grande Réserve”, “Extra Vieux”, “Extra Old”, “XO”, “Hors d’Age”, for rhums aged at least 6 years.
  • the mention “millésime” (vintage) followed by the mention of one year for rhums aged at least 6 years.

Conditions of presentation:

The rhums for which will be claimed the geographical indication “Rhum de la Guadeloupe”, may not be offered to the public, shipped or offered for sale without the statements, labels, invoices and any commercial document and on the movement titles , the aforementioned geographical indication and the additional information shall be written in visible characters.

Part II Reporting Requirements and Record Keeping

1. Reporting obligations

Operators make the following declarations:

Declaration of Claim
This summary declaration shall be sent to the defense and management body each year no later than 10 February of the year following the distillation period.

It recapitulates the quantities in volumes and volumes of pure alcohol of rhums in geographical indication “Rhum de la Guadeloupe” elaborated from their distillation, if necessary, according to the complementary mention “Agricole” or “de sucrerie” to which they belong.

It divides these rhums in the different categories corresponding to complementary mentions to which they can possibly claim: “blanc”, “brun”, “élevé sous-bois”, “vieux”.

It indicates the possibly downgraded volumes in one or the other of these categories during the year.

2. Record keeping

Operators shall make available for the purpose of carrying out control operations, in the form of a paper register or computer files, the following data:

  • Reception register

This register includes the following elements:

  • for facilities receiving cane: date and time of cane weighing with gross weight, tare weight, net weight, name of cane planter with reference (pasture number) of the cane plot from where canes are delivered.
  • for facilities processing sweeteners: date and time of receipt of molasses or syrups with net weight and name of supplier (if different from producer of sweeteners).
  • Fermentation register

This register comprises at least the following elements: tank number, date and time of filling start of the fermentation tank, date and time of the end of filling of the fermentation tank, volume of cane juice or molasses or of syrups put into fermentation.

  • Distillation register

This register includes the following information: date and start time and the end of distillation, references of distilled tanks, the alcoholic strength of the “wine” of each of the distilled tanks, quantity and alcoholic strength by volume of rhum obtained.

  • Registration of élevé sous-bois

This register includes the date and place of rhum distillation and the address of the cellar, the date of aging, the ability of the housing used, the volume and the alcohol content of rhum turning into élevé sous-bois.

  • Recapitulative register of aged rhums and their dwellings

This register includes the following summary elements: total volume of aged rhums with the total capacity of their dwellings, and the volumes of rhums being aged with the total capacity of their dwellings.

  • Monthly register of entry and exit of rhums

This register shall include at least the following elements: the entries, exits and the initial and final stocks of each category and additional indication of pure alcohol.

Each breakdown of the quantities committed by complementary mention (“blanc”, “brun”, “élevé sous-bois”,

“Vieux”, “Agricole”, “de sucrerie”) or complementary denomination (“Marie-Galante”) is the subject of a specific line for the registration of movements.

The registers and declarations provided for by the general regulations, in particular the Monthly Customs Summary Declaration (DRM), the annual inventory or the material accounting books can be used for the presentation of these elements.

Part III Main points to control

MAIN POINTS TO CHECKEVALUATION METHODS
Location of operatorsDocumentary review
Analytical characteristics to the distillation of rhums: maximum TAVDocumentary review
Maximum capacity of keeping aged rhumsDocumentary Review and / or Visual Inspection
Minimum duration of maturation or agingDocument Review and / or Counting number of warehouses
Analytical characteristicsAnalytical review of the product before the consumption
Organoleptic characteristicsOrganoleptic examination of the product before the consumption

References concerning control structures Institut National de l’Origine et de la Qualité (I.N.A.O.)

12, rue Henri Rol-Tanguy
TSA 30003
93555 – MONTREUIL-SOUS-BOIS CEDEX Tél : (33) (0)1.73.30.38.00
Fax : (33) (0)1.73.30.38.04
Email : info@inao.gouv.fr

Verification of compliance with these specifications is carried out by a third-party body offering guarantees of competence, impartiality, and independence under the authority of INAO on the basis of an approved inspection plan.

The inspection plan recalls the self-checks carried out by the operators on their own activity and the internal controls carried out under the responsibility of the defense and management body. It indicates the external controls performed by the third party as well as the analytical and organoleptic examinations.

The set of controls is performed by sampling.

3 thoughts on “Guadeloupe’s Rhum GI and How it Compares to Martinique’s AOC

Add yours

  1. GI & AOC are extremely laudable & important for the category yet about a quarter of the way in my mind glazed over & I reached out for a drink.
    It’s the taste & flavours of rum that excite me.
    I lost myself in the rum & never finished off the regulatory reams.

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