British Navy Rum Ration Hijinks

Stories about the British Navy’s daily rum ration inevitably include imagery of sailors lined up at the grog tub, emblazoned with “God Save the Queen” – or “King”, if you go back far enough. It suggests that sailors were anxiously awaiting their mix of rum and water (“grog”), eager to consume it straightaway. However, sailors… Continue Reading →

British Navy Rum Before Vernon’s Grog

The narrative most rum enthusiasts know about British navy rum usually starts around 1731, when the British Navy declared that (in certain parts of the globe) a daily ration of rum was to be issued to their sailors. Alternately, they might know that in 1740 Admiral Edward Vernon decreed that the sailors’ daily rum ration… Continue Reading →

Splicing the Mainbrace Without Navy Rum?

As we hurtle towards the 50th Anniversary of Black Tot day, a lot of interest is focused on the British Royal Navy’s tradition of issuing a daily rum ration to its members. One of the hallowed auxiliary traditions of the rum ration was the order of “Splice the Mainbrace”, called by an officer on the… Continue Reading →

Untangling All the Modern Navy Rums

Who doesn’t love the story of British Navy Rum? With the 50th anniversary of Black Tot Day coming up on July 31st, 2020, liquor store shelves are awash in “navy rum”. As someone who’s spent the last 18th months intensively studying British navy rum, I’m quite excited about all this! But, in a cruel twist… Continue Reading →

A (Non-)History of Jamaica in British Navy Rum

It’s common knowledge In the rum world from sheer repetition: The fabled British Navy rum, served to bluejackets for three centuries, is a blend of rums from the Four Horsemen of British Colonial  rum: Jamaica, Guyana, Barbados, and Trinidad. It’s an appealing narrative. Who doesn’t love funky Jamaican rum? (Mrs. Wonk will come around eventually… Continue Reading →

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